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NASA Images
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This picture of the Earth and Moon in a single frame, the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft, was recorded September 18, 1977, but NASAs Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when...
Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Earth, What -- Moon, What --...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=1643
NASA Images
by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL)
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Voyager 2 returned this picture of the Uranus rings on Jan. 22, 1986, from a distance of 2.52 million kilometers (1.56 million miles). All nine known rings are visible in this image, a 15-second exposure through the clear filter on Voyager's narrow-angle camera. The rings are quite dark and very narrow. The most prominent and outermost of the nine, called epsilon, is seen at top. The next three in toward Uranus -- called delta, gamma and eta -- are much fainter and more narrow than the epsilon...
Topics: What -- Voyager 2, What -- Uranus, What -- Voyager, Where -- Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
Source: http://nix.ksc.nasa.gov/info?id=PIA01977&orgid=10
NASA Images
by NASA
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This silhouetted image of the rings of Uranus was taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft on Jan. 24, 1986, just 27 minutes before its closest approach to the planet. A half-second exposure was made with the wide-angle camera at a distance of 63,300 kilometers (39,300 miles). This image shows the nine originally known rings appearing as dark lines against the brighter clouds of the planet. The most prominent ring, called epsilon, appears at the right; barely visible at the left are the three rings...
Topics: What -- Uranus, What -- Voyager 2, What -- FAST, What -- Voyager, Where -- Jet Propulsion...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01985
NASA Images
by NASA
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This dramatic Voyager 2 picture reveals a continuous distribution of small particles throughout the Uranus ring system. Voyager took this image while in the shadow of Uranus, at a distance of 236,000 kilometers (142,000 miles and a resolution of about 33 km (20 ml). This unique geometry -- the highest phase angle at which Voyager imaged the rings -- allows us to see lanes of fine dust particles not visible from other viewing angles. All the previously known rings are visible here, however, some...
Topics: Solar System Exploration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Planets, What -- Voyager 2, What -- Uranus,...
Source: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=2090
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The unlit side of the rings glows with scattered sunlight as two moons circle giant Saturn. The light reaching Cassini in this view has traveled many paths before being captured. At left, Mimas (397 kilometers, or 247 miles across) presents its dark side. Enceladus (505 kilometers, or 314 miles across), on the far side of the rings, is lit by "Saturnshine," or reflected sunlight coming from the planet. Saturn, in turn, is faintly lit in the south by light reflecting off the rings....
Topics: What -- Saturn, What -- Cassini, What -- Mimas, What -- Enceladus, What -- Visible Light, What --...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08220
NASA Images
by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The stars of the Pleiades cluster, also known by the names "M45" and "the Seven Sisters," shine brightly in this view from the Cassini spacecraft. The cluster is comprised of hundreds of stars, a few of which are visible to the unaided eye on Earth as a brilliant grouping in the constellation Taurus. Some faint nebulous material is seen here. This reflection nebula is dust that reflects the light of the hot, blue stars in the cluster. The monochrome view was made by...
Topics: What -- Cassini, What -- Earth, What -- Constellation, What -- Taurus, What -- Huygens Probe, Where...
Source: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08260